Posted by: csdailyblog | May 17, 2011

Conserve School Science in the Outdoor Classroom

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As you can see from the accompanying photos of recent environmental science classes, Conserve School students and teachers are taking good advantage of the warmer weather. Our long blocks allow plenty of time for students to get out on our lakes and trails to investigate the natural world. In science classes last week and this week with teachers Robert Eady and Andy Milbauer, students have been cooking with solar power, finding macro-invertebrates in our lake beds, sampling lake water in canoes, and building a mini-greenhouse. (Macro-invertebrates are animals without backbones that can be seen without magnification, for example, crayfish, insect larvae, snails, and aquatic worms. The presence of these creatures is an important indicator of water quality.)

Conserve School’s campus is an ideal setting for hands-on environmental science learning, and the financial support provided by Central Steel and Wire allows us to equip all of our students with high-quality materials and tools for each science activity. Our campus buildings were designed to facilitate nature study, with easy access to the outdoors. Little Donahue Lake is just a few steps away from our science labs and lecture halls, and Big Donahue Lake is right outside our recreation center. Both lakes are used frequently by students and teachers for research. Canoes, digital probes, nets, waders, sampling equipment, grow lights and shelves — all the necessary equipment for environmental studies — are stored near at hand and ready to go so that teachers and students can make the most of their time together.

Mary Anna

Read more about hands-on, active learning at Conserve School on our website at www.conserveschool.org.

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